Housing

See All Topics
Para ver este artículo en español por favor visite aquí. (To view this article in Spanish, visit here.)
Para ver este artículo en español por favor visite aquí. (To view this article in Spanish, visit here.)
The federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 protects individuals against housing discrimination on the basis on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, and disability.  New York Human Rights Law includes these federally protected classes and also grants additional protections on the basis of age, marital status, military status, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, and source of income.
To view this article in Spanish, visit here.
To view this article in Spanish, visit here.
To view this article in Spanish, visit here.
To view this article in Spanish, visit here.   Tenants often have problems trying to get their landlords to make repairs. This article provides general information about how you can try to get the repairs done. It also shows how you can protect yourself in case you have to go to court.   The Law
You should be treated fairly and with respect when you go to court. If you had a court hearing and the Town, Village, or City Judge or Justice did not treat you with fairness and courtesy, you have a right to complain. The complaint form is available online at the following address: http://www.scjc.state.ny.us/General.Information/Gen.Info.Pages/filecomplaint.htm.
To view this article in Spanish, visit here. What is a security deposit? A security deposit is money that you pay to your landlord when you move in. Your landlord holds this money until you move out. If you damage the property or do not pay rent, the landlord can keep the money. When you move out, if there is no damage and you don’t owe your landlord any rent, utilities, or storage fees - then you can get the security deposit back.
To view this article in Spanish, visit here.   What do I need to know about illegal evictions?